JOAN MITCHELLAmerican 1926 - 1992

Joan Mitchell has long been regarded as one of the most important figures to emerge from the second generation of Abstract Expressionists. Untitled, 1972 is stylistically consistent with Mitchell's mature work, comprising the use of richly coloured, gestural abstractions set within a composition that mirrors the wild, energetic vigour synonymous with her technique. Often inspired by landscape and poetry, Mitchell sought to capture a purely emotional experience of nature where the cognitive impression took precedence over the recognisable image. She herself wrote: “I have feelings about water and sky. I like a view. I don't like to look at a wall.” Acquiring a house in Vétheuil outside Paris in 1967, Mitchell settled in the peaceful tranquillity of her new environs with panoramic views over the Seine. While tempting to connect her more visually harmonious aesthetic from this period with Vétheuil's most well-known artistic resident, Claude Monet, Mitchell refuted such claims, stating to The New York Times: “I bought this house because I liked the view, not out of any love for Monet”, stingingly mispronouncing the artist's name so it rhymed with ‘bonnet'.
Provenance:
Carl Plansky, NY (gift from the artist);
Succession Carl Plansky 2009, NY;
Private collection, Pennsylvania;
Collection of David Schaff, Philadelphia;
Jane Roberts Fine Arts, Paris;
Private collection, London;
Private collection, Brussels (since 2012)

JOAN MITCHELLAmerican 1926 - 1992

Joan Mitchell was born in Chicago in 1926. Her artistic education began at Smith College in Massachusetts followed by the Art Institute of Chicago where she earned a BFA in 1947 and an MFA in 1950. Between 1948 and 1949, she won a scholarship to travel to France for a year where her style developed towards abstraction. Returning to New York, she participated in the 9th Street Show in New York where she exhibited alongside contemporaries including Willem De Kooning, Lee Krassner, Jackson Pollock and Grace Hartigan. From 1955 onwards Mitchell began to divide her time between New York and France before permanently moving to Vétheuil in 1968. She continued to work there until her death in 1992.