ALBERT MARQUETFrench 1875 - 1947

Marquet painted this sweeping, vibrant view of the bay of Bab-el-Oud in Algiers from his home in Montplaisant, which afforded aerial views of the Algerian capital. Forced to leave France because of his political views against the German regime, Marquet and his wife Marcelle remained at Djenan Sidi Saïd, their villa in Montplaisant, from 1941 to 1945. Growing tired of exile and anxious to return to France, Marquet immersed himself in painting and captured the city in varying lights and moods from atop his terrace. Painted in warm shades of blue, green and apricot, the present work captures the heat emanating from sun-drenched hilltops and stucco buildings.

Marquet's fascination with Algeria began in the winter of 1920, when he travelled south on the advice of his doctor following a severe bout of influenza. The following year he met his future wife, the French-Algerian author Marcelle Martinet, and the couple returned to Algeria every winter. Marquet's brightly coloured canvases attracted many young artists to his studio and, as the curator Jean Alazard wrote, markedly influenced the School of Algiers, a term that loosely referred to contemporary Orientalists working in the country.
Provenance:
Galerie Alex Maguy, Paris
Private collection
Galerie Daniel Malingue, Paris
Private collection, France (acquired from the above in June 1993)

ALBERT MARQUETFrench 1875 - 1947

Marquet was amongst the Fauvist painters who participated in the Salon d’Automne of 1905, thus launching Fauvism and its radical approach to colour into the history of art. In contrast to Matisse’s brilliant reds and the violent energy of de Vlaminck, Marquet used pure pigment to capture heat and light. His glowing landscape paintings, such as the present work, most palpably illustrate Marquet’s affinity with Fauvism. His work can be found in numerous international public collections, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Hermitage and the Musée d'Art modern in Paris.